Eastern Cottonwood

Eastern Cottonwood

$9.99
Size *
Package of *
Qty
Ships Mid November 2019

Eastern Cottonwood

Eastern Cottonwood is the answer if you need some shade, but don't want to wait long. Eastern Cottonwoods grow 5 feet on average, although some individuals can grow up to 15 feet in a single year. The tree reaches typical heights of between 70 feet and 100 feet, but some specimens have soared to nearly 200 feet. Eastern Cottonwoods are sturdy trees that can stand temperatures down to -40 degrees Fahrenheit. While they perform best in moist soil, they can handle soil conditions running from muddy to dry. They also don't care whether the ground is acidic or alkaline. Just plant them in full sun, and they'll succeed in virtually any yard.

Eastern Cottonwoods supply shade by sending out branches covered with large dark green leaves to form a canopy averaging 65 feet wide.

The leaves themselves, 3 to 5 inches in width and length, have a triangular shape. They also possess saw tooth edges and flat stems that allow them to flutter in even the slightest breeze quickly. When Fall arrives, these leaves transition to a light yellow color. Eastern Cottonwoods are either male or female. The females produce up to 40 million seeds per year when mature. Each tiny seed is wrapped in a thin tuft of cotton-like fibers that give the tree its name. In May and June, these seeds release from pea-like pods. A mass of the cotton wisps sent flying in a sudden gust to the accompaniment of shaking leaves is quite a spectacle. Of course, if the tree is male, it eliminates this possibility. Completing the stately charm of this majestic tree is a thick layer of gray bark on mature trees that features deep furrows. These furrows create large, long vertical ridges not seen on other common types of trees.

These Eastern Cottonwood trees are grown from cuttings.

They are shipped bare root during dormancy which is late October through early April. Plant upon arrival and water well the first 3-4 weeks.

They 

Full Description
  • Description

    Eastern Cottonwood

    Eastern Cottonwood is the answer if you need some shade, but don't want to wait long. Eastern Cottonwoods grow 5 feet on average, although some individuals can grow up to 15 feet in a single year. The tree reaches typical heights of between 70 feet and 100 feet, but some specimens have soared to nearly 200 feet. Eastern Cottonwoods are sturdy trees that can stand temperatures down to -40 degrees Fahrenheit. While they perform best in moist soil, they can handle soil conditions running from muddy to dry. They also don't care whether the ground is acidic or alkaline. Just plant them in full sun, and they'll succeed in virtually any yard.

    Eastern Cottonwoods supply shade by sending out branches covered with large dark green leaves to form a canopy averaging 65 feet wide.

    The leaves themselves, 3 to 5 inches in width and length, have a triangular shape. They also possess saw tooth edges and flat stems that allow them to flutter in even the slightest breeze quickly. When Fall arrives, these leaves transition to a light yellow color. Eastern Cottonwoods are either male or female. The females produce up to 40 million seeds per year when mature. Each tiny seed is wrapped in a thin tuft of cotton-like fibers that give the tree its name. In May and June, these seeds release from pea-like pods. A mass of the cotton wisps sent flying in a sudden gust to the accompaniment of shaking leaves is quite a spectacle. Of course, if the tree is male, it eliminates this possibility. Completing the stately charm of this majestic tree is a thick layer of gray bark on mature trees that features deep furrows. These furrows create large, long vertical ridges not seen on other common types of trees.

    These Eastern Cottonwood trees are grown from cuttings.

    They are shipped bare root during dormancy which is late October through early April. Plant upon arrival and water well the first 3-4 weeks.

    They 

  • Reviews

    Reviews

    Be the first to

  • Details

    Details

    Current Stock: